Sphenopalatine Ganglion Nerve Block

Sphenopalatine Ganglion Nerve BlockWhat is an SPG block, and how can it help my headaches?

The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is a nerve bundle located deep in the face, behind the root of the nose; it is part of the autonomic nervous system. For a long time the SPG has been a target for the treatment of severe headaches. The current indications for SPG blocks includeL chronic/episodic migraines, cluster headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, and medication overuse headaches. The toughest obstacle of performing the SPG has always been location. The SPG, as stated earlier, is located centrally behind the nose, inferiorly to the eyes. Read more…


Cervicogenic Headaches and Occipital Nerve Blocks

Cervicogenic Headaches and Occipital Nerve BlocksMany patients with chronic headaches, report their headaches arising from the neck or base of the skull. The pain is usually uni-lateral (one-sided). From the neck, the pain can then radiate forward towards the top of the head, forehead, eye, or all the above. This is the definition of a cervicogenic headache. Read more…


Discogenic Low Back Pain and Discograms

Discogenic Low Back Pain and DiscogramsIn the lumbar spine, there are five vertebrae or bones separated by five intervertebral discs.

The lumbar vertebrae are named one through five with lumbar vertebral body one being the superior most and lumbar five being the inferior most. Read more…


Lumbar Radiculopathy

Lumbar RadiculopathyIf I have a back condition, why do I have leg pain?

This is a common question encountered in the spine world.

Lumbar radiculopathy is a disease process that affects one or more lumbar nerve roots. The lumbar spine consists of five vertebral moveable bones (block–like structures). The bones are labeled by number L-1, L-2, L-3, etc. In between each of the vertebral bones are shock absorbers, or what we call discs. Read more…


Neck and Shoulder Pain? Contact Prairie Spine and Pain Institute Today

Neck and Shoulder Pain? Contact Prairie Spine and Pain Institute TodayIn physical therapy, we see many patients with neck and shoulder pain. This can be rather tricky to evaluate and treat. Often time’s pain from the neck may refer symptoms to the shoulder. On the other hand, pain from the shoulder can refer to the neck. Our job as therapists is to help the patient define the source of their symptoms and treat the condition accordingly. For the purpose of this article we will discuss neck pain that leads to shoulder pain as a secondary issue. Read more…